Exmortis

Exmortis is the first in a trilogy created by Australian Developer, Ben Leffler. After awaking in a forest, with no recollection of your past or who you are, you stumble upon a house. You enter only to discover this house, there’s something wrong about it and the more rooms you explore, the more questions are raised and the more you wonder how you’ll get out of this horror.

Who are you? Where are you? What is this house? All your questions will be answered, if you pay close enough attention that is...

Who are you? Where are you? What is this house? All your questions will be answered, if you pay close enough attention that is…

This is Exmortis, an online game which similar to The House, where its a point and click as you explore the many rooms of the house to unravel the mystery of your identity and the house itself. Now normally these games aren’t going to last that long and there normally isn’t a deep story to explain the game. It’s simply an experience and the main point of these games is to scare you. Exmortis has all these three going for it, with a longer than usual gameplay, deep storyline with multiple endings and scare you it does.

Now let’s begin with the gameplay. You point and click around each room (make sure you do this well, for several items or locations are hard to spot or easy to miss so make sure you scour every room top to bottom) and the character will give their thoughts on key items or blood (there’s a lot of blood) in the room. The game really needs you to pay attention to your surroundings as you’ll find keys to open rooms, a combination to unlock a safe and books, items to equip, from journals to diaries, which you’ll need to progress and inform you of the story.

Be careful to play close attention, this is not the sort of game you can rush through...or you can, you'll just be missing a whole lot of the experience.

Be careful to play close attention, this is not the sort of game you can rush through…or you can, you’ll just be missing a whole lot of the experience.

The game does a good job of quickly developing a mythos surrounding the Exmortis and I really enjoyed how as you progress, the more you discover and if you pay attention to the writings given to you, a certain realisation dawns on you and it’s only until later, that everything adds up. This is a key element in Exmortis as the plot feels thought out and the game will never tell you flat out what is going on which is cool as you can piece together each piece of the puzzle and unlike other similar games, you don’t have to interact with every item to progress, meaning that there are many things you could miss during your first playthrough.

The game doesn’t hold your hand but as was is the case with these games, sometimes you may find yourself stuck with no logical way to progress and you might find yourself going from room to room, hoping to understand how to progress. Also the game does a better job of creating an atmosphere of unease and disturbance and delivers a few horrific moments (one moment in particular towards the end is truly terrifying) for when it tries to ‘scare’ you (a figure laughing insanely and the obvious click on person, they’ll scream at you scare) fall very flat but this is not only a problem of Exmortis.

Thoughts like these are a welcome addition, the game does use a few instances of spoken speech but only later in the game, which is a shame.

Thoughts like these are a welcome addition, the game does use a few instances of spoken speech but only later in the game, which is a shame.

The sound effects are mostly limited to an atmospheric track and sound effects which differ according to which room you find yourself in. The majority of these work well as you go from room to room and help immerse yourself into the game. The diversity of sounds is great and as you discover more around the house, the game uses real life images for the deceased in the game and t

 

P&Cs

P – Longer and with a deeper story than usual, a few terrifying moments, diversity in locations and interactions, multiple endings.

C – Path to progress not clear at times, laughable jump scares.

Lupo Meter

Fear – Unease while playing, coupled with one or two frightening moments though a couple more fall flat.

Sound – Sound effects are good though the ambient music feels underused.

Horror – Lost memory is nothing new though I like how as you uncover more, you start to feel scared about who you could be and what it means.

World – Diverse house, with real life images used and a lot of blood, unfortunately the house doesn’t feel as frightening as it should.

Final Words

Exmortis is a longer than usual experience in this genre of online games and treats players to a mythos surrounding entities unknown and the mystery of your identity, as well as a longer experience and interactivity above the normal horror flash games. Of course there are a few  setbacks but overall the experience is welcomed so if you’re a fan of these kind of games or don’t mind a slow paced horror game, try Exmortis.

 

Play Exmortis Now.

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